Besides EDIE, Collective now has other software it licenses to payers and accountable care organizations, but it does not charge post-acute operators, ambulatory providers and others who don't have risk. “Our model is that we license our software to those who could see economic benefit through improving coordination of their members, which makes sense,” he says. “Others may not benefit economically, so we don’t charge them.”
Since its founding eight years ago, Collective Medical (not to be confused with employee benefits company Collective Health) has produced a software platform comprised of two main products. EDIE, designed for emergency departments, connects emergency teams across multiple facilities to identify high-risk, complex needs patients and immediately access care history upon admittance. The PreManage product is intended for a wider population of patients, and is marketed to health plans and providers. It also identifies and tracks high-risk patients upon admittance and discharge from inpatient or emergency care, while allowing teams to easily communicate and coordinate throughout a patient’s care.
So much remains ambiguous about the regulated future of legalized pot in California, even more so in the Central Valley. As some cities are still waiting to make their final decision, others have banned it outright, and Fresno is soon to embark on the unique challenge of writing new policies for medical marijuana businesses, from growing all the way to sales – but one thing is clear, and that it is going to make for a busy yet very interesting 2018.
If you’re looking to make the leap from cannabis consumer to pot producer, Home Grown Academy in Carver can help. Owners Jason Cullinan and Paul Brennan offer classes for all levels, from the aspiring cultivator to the experienced producer. Learn the fundamentals in Intro to Growing Cannabis or discover how to tackle a bigger project with Grow Room Design & Construction. The four-hour classes cost $150; a series of five goes for $500.

Located in Fresno County, the city began as a humble stop on the San Joaquin Railroad.  Land developers always arrive to do their thing, working land deals, about any new or proposed railway station.  In 1890-2, a group of Fresno businessmen brought the railway to town and in doing so, purchased the right-of-way from Clovis farmers as well as the surrounding territory. Sadly, this is formula of how to make big money. Insiders use insider information and have access to cash to take advantage of the situation. All the while, good honest work that forms the real backbone of the country strong my not necessarily be rewarded. While these entrepreneurs and their financiers are the catalyst in making it all happen,  too many low life gamers scoop off more than their fair share of the cream.  Does capitalism equate to insider deals and foul play?  No, cheaters cheat, to get more than their fair share, no matter what the system.
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