jQuery(document).ready(function(){jQuery(".kiwi-logo-carousel-default").bxSlider({mode:"horizontal",speed:1500,slideMargin:70,infiniteLoop:true,hideControlOnEnd:true,captions:false,ticker:false,tickerHover:false,adaptiveHeight:false,responsive:true,pager:false,controls:false,autoControls:false,minSlides:1,maxSlides:6,moveSlides:1,slideWidth:100,auto:true,pause:1500,useCSS:false});});
To help fund Collective Medical, Green and van den Akker entered business plan competitions, with the motto “Save lives through better technology in healthcare,” and won a total of $15,000. “We didn’t try to raise money, we were more focused on making sure we can drive value for hospitals,” says van den Akker, who developed the technology using HL7 standards to connect different electronic health records. Green tried to drum up more customers, while holding jobs at National Instruments and later Dell in Austin, Texas.
Situations like these make Baumgartner stand out in a state packed with anonymous delivery services. Whatever condition or ailment you suffer from, Carla Baumgartner and her team of doctors and professionals will find a product to give you relief, thus improving the quality of your life. So many dispensaries in California only focus on the percent of THC in their products, rather than the quality and characteristics of the high certain strains and products give. At Ganja Runner, they carry strains developed to help people in need, like 2:1 CBD:THC flower. Recently, Hmbldt metered dose pens have become very popular due to their simplicity. “I love them [Hmbldt pens] because it’s easy to pick the right medicine. If you’re anxious, use the Calm pen… If you’re in pain, use Relief. The simplicity is what Ganja Runner is all about.”
Baran says that although automation of repetitive tasks is the ultimate goal, the first step in automation is delegation. “That means shifting the work from physician to staff and using technology to make that process as easy as possible. For the physicians it looks like automation because you are taking this work off their plates, and we use technology to make the process as easy as possible for the staff.”
Of course, inevitably, there was talk around the talk of the hype cycle involving artificial intelligence. One of those engaging in that discussion was Paul Chang, M.D.., a practicing radiologist and medical director of enterprise imaging at the University of Chicago. Dr. Chang gave a presentation on Tuesday about AI. According a report by Michael Walter in Radiology Business, Dr. Chang said, “AI is not new or spooky. It’s been around for decades. So why the hype?” He described computer-aided detection (CAD) as a form of artificial intelligence, one that radiologists have been making use of for years.
Workshops are generally a combination of classroom instruction and hands-on demonstrations, so students should be prepared to get their hands dirty — literally. Mixing soil is a key element of the Methods of Cultivation class. Smoking is prohibited in the classroom, though vape pens are allowed. Still, the focus is on instruction rather than consumption, the owners say.
Collective Medical improves outcomes and lowers costs on an impressive scale. In a Brookings Institution review of Medicaid patients who visited emergency rooms in Washington State, Collective Medical’s network and EDIE application—allowing actionable, real-time coordination across organizations—was one of the core strategies for lowering the number of ED visits by patients with patterns of high ED utilization. By partnering with Collective Medical to focus on these patients, Washington State reported $34 million in savings in emergency costs and a decline of 9.9 percent in emergency department visits in its first year of use in 2013.
Unfortunately, that's not the only message this raid sent. Thanks to decades of demonization, much of it fueled by alcohol and tobacco interests, marijuana still carries a stigma. Police actions like this only reinforce that stigma. That people who get their medicine from dispensaries instead of pharmacists are druggies, and the employees of such establishments can still get their mugs displayed like drug dealers.
×