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SALT LAKE CITY--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Collective Medical, delivering the nation’s largest network for care collaboration, has secured $47.5 million in Series A funding. The investment, led by Kleiner Perkins, will be used to expand and advance the company’s care team collaboration network accelerating efforts to drive better patient outcomes nationwide.
The company has an intriguing startup story. Fifteen years ago, one of the founders’ mother, Patti Green, was an emergency department social worker in Boise, Idaho, and suspected that some patients were opioid seekers. She set up a rudimentary collaborative care plan for providers to use to identify and help these patients. “It is easy for us now to talk about the opioid epidemic. Nobody was really talking about it 15 years ago, but she was seeing it on the ground,” says Chris Klomp, Collective’s CEO, “and she did something about it.”

“We had a guillotine over our head,” says Stephen Anderson, an emergency medicine doctor at MultiCare Auburn Medical Center, which operates eight hospitals in and around Tacoma and Spokane, Washington. Hospitals pleaded for their own solution. “[We said] instead of blocking access, let us coordinate care of high utilizers.” The governor gave them three months.
Collective Medical builds collaborative care networks. We help disparate stakeholders across the continuum — emergency, inpatient, skilled nursing facilities, mental health stakeholders, and even health plans and ACOs with their care managers – become aware when a patient needs them, particularly those vulnerable members who have figuratively fallen. We then unify their records collectively and help pick that person up.
  

Collective seeks to close provider communication gaps that undermine patient care. It uses data feeds, risk analytics, notifications, and shared care guidelines to reduce emergency department (ED) utilization, inpatient readmissions and downstream care transitions, including to post-acute operators. After collecting data from all EDs visited by a patient, its solution packages that data into actionable insights, and delivers them to clinicians via real-time notifications. Collective is currently partnered with more than a dozen state hospital associations, and recently added the Florida Hospital Association to its network of partners.
Salt Lake City, Utah-based patient management platform maker Collective Medical Technologies announced today that it has raised $47.5 million in a series A funding round led by investment firm Kleiner Perkins. Other participants in the round include Bessemer Venture Partners, Maverick Ventures, Kaiser Permanente Ventures, Providence Ventures, Peterson Ventures, and Epic Ventures.
Besides EDIE, Collective now has other software it licenses to payers and accountable care organizations, but it does not charge post-acute operators, ambulatory providers and others who don't have risk. “Our model is that we license our software to those who could see economic benefit through improving coordination of their members, which makes sense,” he says. “Others may not benefit economically, so we don’t charge them.”

In the most states now a cannabis delivery service is legal as a part of dispensing (B2C) or between licensed premises by a licensee or licensee representative. For example, a cannabis retailer may deliver a cannabis item to a residence in Oregon, however the retailer must receive written approval from the Commission prior to making any deliveries and may not carry or transport at any one time more than a total of $3000 in retail value worth of marijuana items designated for retail delivery.
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The company got its start in 2010. Baran, a Ph.D. student in engineering at the University of Wisconsin at the time, was thinking about how to build apps to make life easier for physicians. He went to a Mayo Clinic Innovation Conference and saw Lyle Berkowitz, M.D., of Northwestern Medicine speaking. “Lyle happened to be speaking there on that very topic, coming at it from the physician perspective,” Baran recalls. “I realized this is exactly the person I need to work with. A few weeks later I drove to Chicago, met with him, and the rest is history. We started this company and have been going ever since.”

Let’s say we have a low-income, low-acuity pediatric asthmatic patient who’s bouncing around emergency departments. Nobody’s looking to increase their volume by having that patient coming to their hospital. The health plan, the Medicaid ACO or MCO, and the pediatrician, pediatric pulmonologist, or emergency department physician all have a perfectly aligned set of incentives to get that patient into the most appropriate care channel, stabilize them, and help them lead a healthy life. What level of interoperability and coordination is required to restore that child to a point of health?


Klomp, who helped out with strategy while working in private equity at Bain Capital in Boston, quit in 2014 to join Collective Medical. And last year, Benjamin Zaniello, who was a chief medical information officer at Providence Health & Services in Washington, joined as chief medical officer. Zaniello helped implement Collective Medical at Providence. He was impressed. “They did this alone for many years,” he says. “It wasn’t just a bunch of people with a power point and a dream, or someone from Google with a personal story in healthcare who wants to fix the system.”
The rehabilitation of neck injuries occurs in three phases. During the first phase, called the acute phase, physiatrists treat pain the inflammation. After they make a specific diagnosis and develop a treatment plan, physiatrists may offer treatment options like ultrasound, electrical stimulation, mobilization, medication, ice and even specialized injections.

“I do have mixed feelings about medical marijuana, I really do. And I can tell you that my feelings have changed over the years after listening to some of the stories that have been told here, from the individuals I’ve talked to and I do believe that there are individuals out there that have a legitimate need for medicinal marijuana [and] I support that, I really do,” he stated during the 12/14 City Council meeting.
“When we had conversations with physicians about the data, some would say, ‘My patient is sicker than yours,’ or ‘I have a different patient population.’ However, we can drill down to the physician’s patients and show the physician where things are. It’s not based on an ivory tower analysis, it’s based on our own data. And, yes, our patients, and our community, are unique—a little older than most, and we have a lot of Europeans here visiting. We have some challenges, but this tool is taking our data and showing us what we need to pursue. That’s pretty powerful.”
“In 2013, President Barack Obama’s attorney general advised prosecutors not to waste money targeting pot growers and sellers that were abiding by state laws but to go after flagrant violations such as trafficking across state lines or selling to minors. Under this policy, several states legalized recreational pot, growers and sellers had begun to drop their guard over fears of a federal crackdown and the business blossomed into a sophisticated, multimillion-dollar industry feeding state government programs with tax dollars.”
The state of California now allows for adults over the age of 21 to possess up to 1 oz of marijuana for personal consumption. Each household (not person) may contain up to 6 plants. However, the rules of growing are likely to differ between cities. As a general rule, plants are to be grown indoors, and they should not be visible to others outside your household. Smoking in public is prohibited under the ballot measure of Prop 64 unless allowed by a local ordinance – in other words, don’t smoke it just anywhere, fines may occur.
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