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Connoisseurs of both cannabis and fine food can indulge both passions with a four-course supper-club experience from Mass Cannabis Chefs. Customers can peruse menus a few weeks ahead and buy tickets online — prices range from $100 to $150 per person — but they don’t learn the address of the event until the day before. The food is far from traditional stoner fare: Past menus have featured stuffed sea scallops, filet mignon, and cherry clafoutis with fresh whipped cream. And there are occasional vegetarian nights. The cannabis infusion in each course is customized to the individual’s preference.

Her personal involvement doesn’t stop there. She often hand delivers the medicine and even works with a hospice center providing relief. “I worked with a woman, my age, who was dying of cancer. Her brother would call me and I would come over with a big bag of prerolled joints. We would smoke together, holding hands, me on the floor, and her laying on the couch.”
Can't believe I haven't found out about this place as I've been living in the area for quite some time now. A friend told me... read more about this place so I HAD to check it out. All you need is an California ID and 21+. No medical card required! All the workers are super chill and very helpful. As a first timer like myself, they give you a free joint after you purchase one or more of their products. Prices aren't bad either. I am definitely going back here whenever I need more goodies!! THANK YOU TORREY HOLISTICS!!!! read less
Collective seeks to close provider communication gaps that undermine patient care. It uses data feeds, risk analytics, notifications, and shared care guidelines to reduce emergency department (ED) utilization, inpatient readmissions and downstream care transitions, including to post-acute operators. After collecting data from all EDs visited by a patient, its solution packages that data into actionable insights, and delivers them to clinicians via real-time notifications. Collective is currently partnered with more than a dozen state hospital associations, and recently added the Florida Hospital Association to its network of partners.
Workshops are generally a combination of classroom instruction and hands-on demonstrations, so students should be prepared to get their hands dirty — literally. Mixing soil is a key element of the Methods of Cultivation class. Smoking is prohibited in the classroom, though vape pens are allowed. Still, the focus is on instruction rather than consumption, the owners say.

The world is focused on these opportunities for good reason, but it’s a necessary but insufficient condition of driving coordination across an otherwise highly fragmented set of providers in a landscape. We have data silos and we need to unify those. We should have a single patient record that isn’t replicated with duplicative tests or because a patient goes from one site of care to another. However, it’s highly unlikely that the entirety of the country is going to be comprised of organizations like Kaiser, Intermountain, and Geisinger. Even those organizations — and I can say this because Kaiser and Intermountain are among the owners of our company — still have affiliated providers that they don’t own and that aren’t on their same record of care. They still require collaboration and coordination across those disparate providers.


To help them draft the ordinances, the city has set aside a budget to hire a consulting firm to “sit with professional city staff, our professional city planners and determine how many dispensaries are needed by this community, where should they go, who should the operators be, [and] how we select the operators,” said Olivier during the 12/14 City Council meeting.

Collective Medical is a Salt Lake City-based developer of collaboration software. I started working on the company with two of my best friends from Boise, Idaho. We grew up together and we all went to Brigham Young University together. Two of us studied computer science and I was the token business guy. I went off to Bain & Company and then Bain Capital for roughly a decade.

Collective Medical is engaged with every national health plan in the country, hundreds of hospitals and health systems, and tens of thousands of providers and care managers including those in emergency departments, primary care practices, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, emergency medical services, and mental and behavioral health organizations. Collective Medical’s network has visibility across 13 states, with an additional 10 states expected to go live in 2018.
The world is focused on these opportunities for good reason, but it’s a necessary but insufficient condition of driving coordination across an otherwise highly fragmented set of providers in a landscape. We have data silos and we need to unify those. We should have a single patient record that isn’t replicated with duplicative tests or because a patient goes from one site of care to another. However, it’s highly unlikely that the entirety of the country is going to be comprised of organizations like Kaiser, Intermountain, and Geisinger. Even those organizations — and I can say this because Kaiser and Intermountain are among the owners of our company — still have affiliated providers that they don’t own and that aren’t on their same record of care. They still require collaboration and coordination across those disparate providers.
In an article by the Madera Tribune, it stated that Madera growers will need to obtain a permit from the city which will need to be displayed in plain view at the residence where the growing will occur. Failure to do so could result in a $1,000 fine per plant or possibly, per day. Renters who would like to grow in their residence would need written permission from their landlord before applying for a permit with the city.
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