Our goal now is to invest in the platform and to grow networks. Building network effect-enabled platforms is capital intensive because you need to reach critical density in a given geography to create value for the constituents there. We’ve done a pretty good job of that. We’re live in 17 states, not just with one or two hospitals, but penetrated broadly to 100 percent of acute hospitals. We’ve got a bunch more in the hopper.
Mitigating the opioid epidemic is a single but timely demonstration of the power of the Collective Medical network. Using the company’s partnership with Washington State as an example, care team collaboration and coordination through Collective Medical has reduced opioid prescriptions coming out of the ED by 24 percent since the program’s inception.

Cannabis reputedly helps unlock the creative parts of your brain. Put that theory to the test with a pot-friendly night of art at Puff, Pass and Paint. The $39 cost includes all art supplies and instruction. Attendees must bring their own cannabis, but smoking, edibles, and vaping are all encouraged as part of the creative process and the social experience. The Colorado-based company offers classes in six states and the District of Columbia. In Boston, they’re available one weekend per month, and the company hopes to launch a weekly schedule soon. During the two-hour class, the instructor provides an example of painting and teaches participants how to re-create the artwork. Attendees are urged to follow their THC-heightened inspiration wherever it leads, says national director Tyler Joyner.
Unlike similar services, Ganjarunner charges tax and their prices can be a bit higher than the average dispensary. But that’s because they pay their taxes and work a little harder to give its clients the professional and discreet treatment they expect. It’s not a high price to pay in a state where it’s hard to tell if all the delivery services on Weedmaps.com are even legal.
“We’re putting collaboration at the heart of the solution to a fragmented healthcare system,” Chris Klomp, CEO of Collective Medical, said in a statement. “Our job is to connect care teams. By arming providers and payers with real-time insights and a platform to seamlessly collaborate across organizations and care settings, we ensure patients don’t slip through the cracks. … We are beyond excited and grateful to be joined by such an extraordinary group of investors who share our vision for further enriching and expanding our network to help care teams provide the most effective care possible.”
Collective Medical empowers care teams to improve patient outcomes by closing the communication gaps that undermine patient care through seamless collaboration. With a nationwide network engaged with every national health plan in the country, hundreds of hospitals and health systems and tens of thousands of providers—including hospitals, emergency departments, skilled nursing facilities, primary care providers, mental and behavioral health clinics, and others—Collective Medical’s system-agnostic platform is trusted by healthcare organizations and payers to identify at-risk and complex patients and facilitate actionable collaboration to make better care decisions and improve outcomes. Based in Salt Lake City, Collective Medical is proven to streamline transitions of care, improve coordination across diverse care teams, and reduce unnecessary hospital admissions. Learn more at www.collectivemedical.com and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

While California government’s encroachment on local authority is nothing new, cities typically have more than 60 days to respond to legislation. Author of AB 243, Assemblyman Jim Wood who’s bill it was that set the deadline by mistake, has since issued an urgent legislation that is expected to pass the legislature for Governor Brown to sign. However the bill does not replace the March 1 deadline with another. Nonetheless cities around the foothills are taking the matter seriously so as to not fall under any type of State control on the matter.
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