“That was a major effort, but some of us had been data scientists before we were physicians, and so we parameterized all these calls. The first pneumonia care path was completed in about nine weeks. We’ve turned around and did a second care path, for sepsis, which is much harder, and we’ve done that in two weeks. We’ve finished sepsis and have moved on to total hip and total knee replacements. We have about 18 or 19 care paths that we’re going to be doing over the next 18 months,” he says.

They found Collective Medical Technologies, a little company from Salt Lake City, Utah, belonging to Adam Green and Wylie van den Akker, childhood friends from Boise, Idaho. Between school and daytime jobs, they had managed to sell their software to 35% of hospitals in Washington. Emergency doctors raved about it and pushed for its adoption. The governor gave the go-ahead, but all 98 hospitals in the state had to comply. To be effective, they had to share patient information. “The value of the network is in participants,” says Chris Klomp, CEO of Collective Medical, and a childhood friend of the founders.
Feeling achy? Hit the massage table. At E-motion Sports Massage in Everett, clients can loosen up with a cannabis-infused ointment that many say boosts the impact of the treatment. Massage therapists use a cream infused with cannabinoids, compounds derived from the cannabis plant. They don’t cause a high, but they do have powerful anti-inflammatory and pain-killing effects, says E-motion owner Mercedes Diaz. And because the cream reduces pain, she says, therapists can work muscles more intensively — and effectively. “It is really great for muscle and joint pain, arthritis, sprains, strains,” Diaz says. “With cannabis, we can get in there and do so much more.” The ointment comes in different concentrations, so therapists can choose the right one for each patient’s needs. E-motion offers cannabis cream as a $25 upgrade to any of its regular massage services, which run $100 to $120.
Unfortunately, that's not the only message this raid sent. Thanks to decades of demonization, much of it fueled by alcohol and tobacco interests, marijuana still carries a stigma. Police actions like this only reinforce that stigma. That people who get their medicine from dispensaries instead of pharmacists are druggies, and the employees of such establishments can still get their mugs displayed like drug dealers.
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