CHCF is investing in Collective Medical to help providers serving Medicaid patients with complex needs to better share and act on data about those patients in real time. Successfully coordinating a patient’s care, especially if it is complex and involves numerous providers both inside and outside of the health care system, requires effective data sharing. When providers fail to share data, a patient’s care can fall through the cracks or be needlessly duplicated, both of which can result in higher costs and poorer outcomes.
“Event notification systems (ENS) and care coordination applications have historically struggled to provide actionable information to providers at the point-of-care,” says Noah Knauf, partner at Kleiner Perkins. “Collective Medical is the first technology we’ve seen that allows the providers and payers in a local healthcare system to efficiently collaborate, delivering significantly better outcomes through risk analytics, real-time notifications, and shared care planning tools. Supporting this team is a rare opportunity to be a part of something that is meaningfully changing the way care is delivered in this country.”
Artificial intelligence solutions—and certainly, the promotion of such solutions—were everywhere this year at the RSNA Conference, held this week at Chicago’s vast McCormick Place, where nearly 49,000 attendees attended clinical education sessions, viewed nearly 700 vendor exhibits. And AI and machine learning promotions, and discussions were everywhere.
var monarchSettings = {"ajaxurl":"https:\/\/torreyholistics.com\/wp-admin\/admin-ajax.php","pageurl":"https:\/\/torreyholistics.com\/","stats_nonce":"ccc3846c79","share_counts":"be41c6fe4a","follow_counts":"d066ff2bf9","total_counts":"bfeefe8722","media_single":"7d2d0e1b4f","media_total":"a976741df9","generate_all_window_nonce":"ee5462c062","no_img_message":"No images available for sharing on this page"};
Besides EDIE, Collective now has other software it licenses to payers and accountable care organizations, but it does not charge post-acute operators, ambulatory providers and others who don't have risk. “Our model is that we license our software to those who could see economic benefit through improving coordination of their members, which makes sense,” he says. “Others may not benefit economically, so we don’t charge them.”
“But Woodlake – a town of less than 8,000 people about 15 miles northeast of Visalia in Tulare County – has pushed forward at breakneck speed, going from idea to ordinance to the approval of two companies’ dispensary proposals in less than six months. City leaders hope to unlock a treasure trove of tax revenue, which can be used to beef up a thinning public service budget and attract customers to a blip on the map found well off the beaten path.” (Rory Appleton, The Fresno Bee)
You can either throw a tremendous number of expensive, scarce bodies at the problem, which isn’t scalable, or you can use technology. I’m not talking about mere notifications that an encounter has occurred, which we do, but a deeper level of collaboration. A mental health provider in the emergency department creates a crisis plan for the patient at 3:00 in the morning that involves a primary care provider who is affiliated with a multi-specialty clinic that is not connected to the health system and a Medicaid managed care manager. How do you help those individuals get on the same page and interact with the patient in sequence so that we’re not wasting resources or missing opportunities to help the patient navigate across the continuum, efficiently using the existing technology infrastructure of each organization? That’s the set of problems that we’re focused on.

Cannabis reputedly helps unlock the creative parts of your brain. Put that theory to the test with a pot-friendly night of art at Puff, Pass and Paint. The $39 cost includes all art supplies and instruction. Attendees must bring their own cannabis, but smoking, edibles, and vaping are all encouraged as part of the creative process and the social experience. The Colorado-based company offers classes in six states and the District of Columbia. In Boston, they’re available one weekend per month, and the company hopes to launch a weekly schedule soon. During the two-hour class, the instructor provides an example of painting and teaches participants how to re-create the artwork. Attendees are urged to follow their THC-heightened inspiration wherever it leads, says national director Tyler Joyner.
Feeling achy? Hit the massage table. At E-motion Sports Massage in Everett, clients can loosen up with a cannabis-infused ointment that many say boosts the impact of the treatment. Massage therapists use a cream infused with cannabinoids, compounds derived from the cannabis plant. They don’t cause a high, but they do have powerful anti-inflammatory and pain-killing effects, says E-motion owner Mercedes Diaz. And because the cream reduces pain, she says, therapists can work muscles more intensively — and effectively. “It is really great for muscle and joint pain, arthritis, sprains, strains,” Diaz says. “With cannabis, we can get in there and do so much more.” The ointment comes in different concentrations, so therapists can choose the right one for each patient’s needs. E-motion offers cannabis cream as a $25 upgrade to any of its regular massage services, which run $100 to $120.
Meanwhile, Dr. Whitfill said, “At the same time, people are realizing that coming up with the algorithm is one piece, but that there are surprising complications. So you develop an algorithm on Siemens equipment, but when you to Fuji, the algorithm fails—it no longer reliably identifies pathology, because it turns out you have to train the algorithm not just on examples form just one manufacturer, but form lots of manufacturers. We continue to find that these algorithms are not as consistent as identifying yourself on Facebook, for example. It’s turning out that radiology is way more complex. We take images on lots of different machines. So huge strides are being made,” he said. “But it’s very clear that human and machine learning together will create the breakthroughs. We talk about physician burnout, and even physicians leaving. I think that machine learning offers a good chance of removing a lot of the drudgery in healthcare. If we can automate some processes, then it will free up our time for quality judgment, and also to spend time talking to patients, not just staring at the screen.”
The state of Virginia had phenomenal leadership and vision. They didn’t just talk about interoperability that could move data from A to B. They’re goal was real coordination. It’s called the EDCC — Emergency Department Care Coordination — initiative because it starts in the emergency department, the front door of the healthcare continuum for so many vulnerable patients. Virginia is seeking to instantiate workflow broadly out into the rest of the community. Not just through interoperability, but by actually prompting coordinated sequences of engagement of various providers across specific patient archetypes to drive resolution.
(function(){var w=window;var ic=w.Intercom;if(typeof ic==="function"){ic('reattach_activator');ic('update',intercomSettings);}else{var d=document;var i=function(){i.c(arguments)};i.q=[];i.c=function(args){i.q.push(args)};w.Intercom=i;function l(){var s=d.createElement('script');s.type='text/javascript';s.async=true;s.src='https://widget.intercom.io/widget/alejae0n';var x=d.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];x.parentNode.insertBefore(s,x);}if(w.attachEvent){w.attachEvent('onload',l);}else{w.addEventListener('load',l,false);}}})()
“But Woodlake – a town of less than 8,000 people about 15 miles northeast of Visalia in Tulare County – has pushed forward at breakneck speed, going from idea to ordinance to the approval of two companies’ dispensary proposals in less than six months. City leaders hope to unlock a treasure trove of tax revenue, which can be used to beef up a thinning public service budget and attract customers to a blip on the map found well off the beaten path.” (Rory Appleton, The Fresno Bee)
In the most states now a cannabis delivery service is legal as a part of dispensing (B2C) or between licensed premises by a licensee or licensee representative. For example, a cannabis retailer may deliver a cannabis item to a residence in Oregon, however the retailer must receive written approval from the Commission prior to making any deliveries and may not carry or transport at any one time more than a total of $3000 in retail value worth of marijuana items designated for retail delivery.
Collective seeks to close provider communication gaps that undermine patient care. It uses data feeds, risk analytics, notifications, and shared care guidelines to reduce emergency department (ED) utilization, inpatient readmissions and downstream care transitions, including to post-acute operators. After collecting data from all EDs visited by a patient, its solution packages that data into actionable insights, and delivers them to clinicians via real-time notifications. Collective is currently partnered with more than a dozen state hospital associations, and recently added the Florida Hospital Association to its network of partners.
Each year, to accompany our Healthcare Informatics 100 list of the largest companies in U.S. health information technology, we profile fast-growing companies that could very well make the list in the future. Below, a write-up of the fourth company that made this year’s Up-and-Comers rendition. The remaining two write-ups will be published throughout this week.
For many the idea of a strain with a 1:1 ratio of THC and CBD may sound ridiculous, but growers strove to achieve this in their strain Cannatonic. Their final product ended up being a 50/50 hybrid strain that barely achieved a THC percentage higher than 6 percent, however, it’s CBD content tested between 6 and 17 percent. Great for those that need pain relief in the morning or afternoon, the strain may also calm muscle spasms, migraines and headaches. It may calm nausea, anxiety, stress and mood disorders.
Collective Medical currently has relationships with each US national health plan and hundreds of hospitals and health systems, according to a statement. There are 13 states currently on Collective's network, with plans to add another 10 states scheduled for 2018. In August, the company was featured for the first time on Inc. Magazine’s Inc 5,000 list of fastest growing companies in America, with $5.8 million in 2016 revenue and 561 percent growth over the last three years.
The company has an intriguing startup story. Fifteen years ago, one of the founders’ mother, Patti Green, was an emergency department social worker in Boise, Idaho, and suspected that some patients were opioid seekers. She set up a rudimentary collaborative care plan for providers to use to identify and help these patients. “It is easy for us now to talk about the opioid epidemic. Nobody was really talking about it 15 years ago, but she was seeing it on the ground,” says Chris Klomp, Collective’s CEO, “and she did something about it.”
The idea started with Miss Bliss, a very successful edible line in the Bay Area. She just had a baby and was going through some depression. Her edible line was doing really well, but she felt a disconnect from the cannabis community and what she was going through as a mother. A lot of women hold stigma and shame around cannabis use, so she wanted to build a community around that. Miss Bliss connected with an administrator at Oaksterdam. They reached out and asked me to not only attend a Ganja Goddess retreat, but also speak on a panel. I arrived to the most beautiful property. It’s like summer camp — a girls’ summer camp with weed! Women from all over the world have started to see this. We’re calling this medicine but we’re still afraid to pull out a vape pen in front of our kids instead of a cocktail. Let’s change that.
#wprev-slider-1 .wprevpro_star_imgs{color: #FDD314;}#wprev-slider-1 .wprev_preview_bradius_T1 {border-radius: 10px;}#wprev-slider-1 .wprev_preview_bg1_T1 {background:#ffffff;}#wprev-slider-1 .wprev_preview_bg2_T1 {background:#ffffff;}#wprev-slider-1 .wprev_preview_tcolor1_T1 {color:#777777;}#wprev-slider-1 .wprev_preview_tcolor2_T1 {color:#555555;}#wprev-slider-1 .wprev_preview_bg1_T1::after{ border-top: 30px solid #ffffff; }
Applicants must comply with the insurance requirements in Title 5 of the Hesperia Municipal Code Chapter 5.50.100(F). The required insurance policy must be purchased and valid prior to the final approval of the Tenant Improvement Permit and issuance of Certificate of Occupancy. Failure to provide valid insurance at the limits specified will result in delay of permit final and Certificate of Occupancy issuance. 
Currently available at select locations in CA, OR, and WA in accordance with local law. This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one years of age and older, or qualified patients. Keep out of the reach of children.

Closer to home, the Irving House and Harding House, in Cambridge, welcome guests to partake as long as they don’t smoke inside or create a ruckus, says owner and manager Rachael Solem. If you prefer homier accommodations, try searching budandbreakfast.com, an Airbnb-style online marketplace where people rent rooms, apartments, and even seaside cottages to those looking for a ganja-oriented getaway.

Our goal now is to invest in the platform and to grow networks. Building network effect-enabled platforms is capital intensive because you need to reach critical density in a given geography to create value for the constituents there. We’ve done a pretty good job of that. We’re live in 17 states, not just with one or two hospitals, but penetrated broadly to 100 percent of acute hospitals. We’ve got a bunch more in the hopper.

“We’re putting collaboration at the heart of the solution to a fragmented healthcare system,” Chris Klomp, CEO of Collective Medical, said in a statement. “Our job is to connect care teams. By arming providers and payers with real-time insights and a platform to seamlessly collaborate across organizations and care settings, we ensure patients don’t slip through the cracks. … We are beyond excited and grateful to be joined by such an extraordinary group of investors who share our vision for further enriching and expanding our network to help care teams provide the most effective care possible.”
Can't believe I haven't found out about this place as I've been living in the area for quite some time now. A friend told me... read more about this place so I HAD to check it out. All you need is an California ID and 21+. No medical card required! All the workers are super chill and very helpful. As a first timer like myself, they give you a free joint after you purchase one or more of their products. Prices aren't bad either. I am definitely going back here whenever I need more goodies!! THANK YOU TORREY HOLISTICS!!!! read less
There continues to be growing interest, and also some hype, around AI tools, but Sanders notes that AI and machine learning are simply another tool. “Historically, what we’ve done is that we had an idea of what we wanted to do, conducted a clinical trial and then proved or disproved the hypothesis, based on the data that we collected. We have a tool with AI which can basically show us relationships that we didn’t know even existed and answer questions that we didn’t know to ask. I think it’s going to open up a tremendous pathway in medicine for us to both reduce cost, improve care and really take better care of our patients,” he says, adding, “When you can say that to physicians, they are on board. They respond to the data.”

As of January 1st, medical and recreational (adult use) marijuana became legal in the state of California. Per the Prop 64 measure, adults over the age of 21 can now consume, purchase, possess, and grow cannabis without the fear of prosecution so long as they are within the regulation of the new law… and in accordance with any other policies put in place by the city in which they reside.

×