The optimal events, sequence, and timing of care were presented to the physician team using an intuitive interface that allowed them to understand exactly why each step, and the timing of the action, was recommended. Upon approval, the team operationalized the new care path by revising the emergency-department and inpatient order sets in the hospital EHR.
“Proposition 64 would allow the state to impose a 15% excise tax on the retail sale of marijuana. Also, the state would be able to levy a cultivation tax on growers of $9.25 per ounce for flowers and $2.75 per ounce for leaves. The ballot measure also would let cities and counties to impose their own taxes to cover costs of services, including enforcement.” (Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times)
Currently available at select locations in CA, OR, and WA in accordance with local law. This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one years of age and older, or qualified patients. Keep out of the reach of children.
In three months, he and his roommate van den Akker, also a computer science student, delivered a web-based application. It included documentation, such as demographics, social determinants, medical history highlights, ER visits and treatment plan. “We tried to minimize the effort hospitals had to expend,” says van den Akker. “If you go after a big data ask, you get pushback.” Still, St. Luke’s didn’t purchase the software. “Hospitals didn’t want to take a bet on two kids in college with no experience in healthcare,” says Green.

“Proposition 64 would allow the state to impose a 15% excise tax on the retail sale of marijuana. Also, the state would be able to levy a cultivation tax on growers of $9.25 per ounce for flowers and $2.75 per ounce for leaves. The ballot measure also would let cities and counties to impose their own taxes to cover costs of services, including enforcement.” (Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times)
Later Clovis lands were sold to a Mr. Marcus Pollasky for the expansion of the townsite. In time, some small industry developed. In 1894, a lumber mill commenced operations to feed the rapidly growing California. The town of Clovis began to take shape and soon a post office and general store opened up.  By 1896, Clovis was reported to have a whopping 500 citizens.
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