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In an article by the Madera Tribune, it stated that Madera growers will need to obtain a permit from the city which will need to be displayed in plain view at the residence where the growing will occur. Failure to do so could result in a $1,000 fine per plant or possibly, per day. Renters who would like to grow in their residence would need written permission from their landlord before applying for a permit with the city.
“When we had conversations with physicians about the data, some would say, ‘My patient is sicker than yours,’ or ‘I have a different patient population.’ However, we can drill down to the physician’s patients and show the physician where things are. It’s not based on an ivory tower analysis, it’s based on our own data. And, yes, our patients, and our community, are unique—a little older than most, and we have a lot of Europeans here visiting. We have some challenges, but this tool is taking our data and showing us what we need to pursue. That’s pretty powerful.”
It was the year 2000 and I left Abott’s Habit. A friend of mine was moving out of town and all his friends needed weed, so that’s how I started my delivery service. It was just me with a pager, seven days a week. I couldn’t keep up with all the orders. My team grew to four girls and we split profits evenly. It became more like a private club, with a password to access. Eventually a woman I had a catering company with got upset and reported me to Santa Monica Police. They came in, raided us and took everything. I went to court and had to go through the legal system. Today I have an amazing lawyer who helped us file for a delivery license in California so we can transition to the recreational market.
“That was a major effort, but some of us had been data scientists before we were physicians, and so we parameterized all these calls. The first pneumonia care path was completed in about nine weeks. We’ve turned around and did a second care path, for sepsis, which is much harder, and we’ve done that in two weeks. We’ve finished sepsis and have moved on to total hip and total knee replacements. We have about 18 or 19 care paths that we’re going to be doing over the next 18 months,” he says.

Sanders says having the data generated by the AI software is critical to getting physicians on board with the project. “When we deployed the tool for the pneumonia care pathway, our physicians were saying, ‘Oh no, not another tool’,” Sanders says. “I brought in a PIT Crew (physician IT crew) and we went through our data with them. I had physicians in the group going through the analysis and they saw that the data was real. We went into the EMR to make sure the data was in fact valid, and after they realized that, then they began to look at the outcomes, the length of stay, the drop in readmissions and how the costs dropped, and they were on board right away.”
After being fed data of past pneumonia treatments, the software automatically created cohorts of patients who had similar outcomes accompanied by the treatments they received at particular times and in what sequence. The program also calculated the direct variable costs, average lengths of stay, readmission and mortality rates for each of those cohorts, along with the statistical significance of its conclusions. Each group had different comorbidities, such as diabetes, COPD and heart failure, which was factored into the application's calculations. At the push of a button, the application created a care path based on the treatment given to the patients in each cohort.
The hospital quickly implemented the new pneumonia pathway by changing the order set in its Allscripts EHR system. As a result, for the pneumonia care path, Flagler Hospital saved $1,350 per patient and reduced the length of stay (LOS) for these patients by two days, on average. What’s more, the hospital reduced readmission by 7 times—the readmission rate dropped from 2.9 percent to 0.4 percent, hospital officials report. The initial work saved nearly $850,000 in unnecessary costs—the costs were trimmed by eliminating labs, X-rays and other processes that did not add value or resulted in a reduction in the lengths of stay or readmissions.

In 2006, they tried to launch the solution as a company, but there were no customers. “No one was willing to take a chance,” Klomp recalls. “Total crickets.” So all three founders went on to other jobs. Klomp went to work for Bain & Co. But the website for the startup was still up, and in 2009 they were contacted by a hospital in Spokane, Wash., that was trying to do work in the high-utilizer space and couldn’t find any other solutions. So the three old friends from Boise resurrected the company.
Salt Lake City, Utah-based patient management platform maker Collective Medical Technologies announced today that it has raised $47.5 million in a series A funding round led by investment firm Kleiner Perkins. Other participants in the round include Bessemer Venture Partners, Maverick Ventures, Kaiser Permanente Ventures, Providence Ventures, Peterson Ventures, and Epic Ventures.
Each day, the Medical Cannabis Program receives hundreds of patient applications. The Program has 30 days to approve a completed application from the date we receive it in our office. While it is the patient’s responsibility to submit an application at least 30 days before their card expires, the Program strongly encourages patients submit applications 60 days prior to their card expiring.
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