Baumgartner’s relationship with cannabis started in her teens, around the same time she was diagnosed with anxiety. Refusing to take pills to deal with her nerves, she took on a move natural approach that included surfing and smoking weed. “My Italian-Catholic mother was horrified,” Baumgartner joked, but clearly her system worked. Now, at age 49, she’s staying ahead of her anxiety in a similar way, with smoking, surfing, meditation and eating right, she’s able to live a successful and productive life.

Important Advisory and Disclaimer:  Before acting on any marijuana related issue under discussed here or otherwise, it is strongly recommended that the reader confirm the ultimate accuracy of their information source.  In many cases, your City Hall official website provides  the important information most people want, permits, startups, ordinances and other MMJ matters.  If you are involved in a serious matter that involves marijuana; criminal, or business;  we advise you to contact a lawyer that specializes in California Cannabis Law and move forward intelligently..
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Workshops are generally a combination of classroom instruction and hands-on demonstrations, so students should be prepared to get their hands dirty — literally. Mixing soil is a key element of the Methods of Cultivation class. Smoking is prohibited in the classroom, though vape pens are allowed. Still, the focus is on instruction rather than consumption, the owners say.
Klomp, who helped out with strategy while working in private equity at Bain Capital in Boston, quit in 2014 to join Collective Medical. And last year, Benjamin Zaniello, who was a chief medical information officer at Providence Health & Services in Washington, joined as chief medical officer. Zaniello helped implement Collective Medical at Providence. He was impressed. “They did this alone for many years,” he says. “It wasn’t just a bunch of people with a power point and a dream, or someone from Google with a personal story in healthcare who wants to fix the system.”
Feeling achy? Hit the massage table. At E-motion Sports Massage in Everett, clients can loosen up with a cannabis-infused ointment that many say boosts the impact of the treatment. Massage therapists use a cream infused with cannabinoids, compounds derived from the cannabis plant. They don’t cause a high, but they do have powerful anti-inflammatory and pain-killing effects, says E-motion owner Mercedes Diaz. And because the cream reduces pain, she says, therapists can work muscles more intensively — and effectively. “It is really great for muscle and joint pain, arthritis, sprains, strains,” Diaz says. “With cannabis, we can get in there and do so much more.” The ointment comes in different concentrations, so therapists can choose the right one for each patient’s needs. E-motion offers cannabis cream as a $25 upgrade to any of its regular massage services, which run $100 to $120.
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The original text amendment included commercial operations open to both medical and recreational marijuana. After a tense debate from City Council and passionate testimonies from the public, City Council Member Steve Brandau motioned to revise the amendment to limit all commercial cannabis operations to that for medicinal purposes only, Garry Bredefeld seconded the motion. Council President, and co-sponsor of the amendment, Clint Olivier, declined the revision before ultimately voting ‘yes’ alongside the rest of the council.
First time buying weed at a recreational dispensary. Honestly, I was a little bit nervous as I approached the security guards. However, they were friendly... read more and had good vibes, helped me out and told me where to go with a smile. The building was professional, well-kept, clean, and had interesting facts about their weed and what they sell. The staff were also very professional and friendly. Don't cry about the price, either, people. I've worked in the fields, growing acres of weed in 100+ degree weather. It takes time and hard effort to grow quality plants. If you want quality shit, you pay for it. This place has it. read less
Businesses may begin their application process with the Bureau of Cannabis Control in Sacramento so long as they have received a permit from the city they plan to operate in. Each municipality can determine their own rules and regulations as to how commercial cannabis will coexist in their communities, if at all. Cities still hold the final ruling on whether or not marijuana businesses can operate within their jurisdiction.

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He can thank Patti Green, a former emergency department social worker at St. Luke’s Regional Medical Center in Boise. In 2000, she started tracking frequent ER visits on a Word document, which allowed her to address underlying causes—the reason behind an opioid addiction, or unawareness a patient qualified for Medicaid. Although rivals, she shared information with nearby Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center on patients who bounced between the two ERs. Doctors loved it.


“We’re putting collaboration at the heart of the solution to a fragmented healthcare system,” Chris Klomp, CEO of Collective Medical, said in a statement. “Our job is to connect care teams. By arming providers and payers with real-time insights and a platform to seamlessly collaborate across organizations and care settings, we ensure patients don’t slip through the cracks. … We are beyond excited and grateful to be joined by such an extraordinary group of investors who share our vision for further enriching and expanding our network to help care teams provide the most effective care possible.”
The rehabilitation of neck injuries occurs in three phases. During the first phase, called the acute phase, physiatrists treat pain the inflammation. After they make a specific diagnosis and develop a treatment plan, physiatrists may offer treatment options like ultrasound, electrical stimulation, mobilization, medication, ice and even specialized injections.
The company got its start in 2010. Baran, a Ph.D. student in engineering at the University of Wisconsin at the time, was thinking about how to build apps to make life easier for physicians. He went to a Mayo Clinic Innovation Conference and saw Lyle Berkowitz, M.D., of Northwestern Medicine speaking. “Lyle happened to be speaking there on that very topic, coming at it from the physician perspective,” Baran recalls. “I realized this is exactly the person I need to work with. A few weeks later I drove to Chicago, met with him, and the rest is history. We started this company and have been going ever since.”
Currently available at select locations in CA, OR, and WA in accordance with local law. This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one years of age and older, or qualified patients. Keep out of the reach of children.

“We’re dedicated to supporting our 100 member hospitals and health systems as they improve the quality and safety of patient care,” says Thornton Kirby, FACHE, President and CEO of SCHA. “Our partnership with Collective is a testament to that dedication. The solution has been supporting the integration of behavioral and physical health in states like Washington, Oregon and California for several years and we’re excited to see how it can impact patient outcomes in South Carolina.”

The company got its start in 2010. Baran, a Ph.D. student in engineering at the University of Wisconsin at the time, was thinking about how to build apps to make life easier for physicians. He went to a Mayo Clinic Innovation Conference and saw Lyle Berkowitz, M.D., of Northwestern Medicine speaking. “Lyle happened to be speaking there on that very topic, coming at it from the physician perspective,” Baran recalls. “I realized this is exactly the person I need to work with. A few weeks later I drove to Chicago, met with him, and the rest is history. We started this company and have been going ever since.”
In 2006, they tried to launch the solution as a company, but there were no customers. “No one was willing to take a chance,” Klomp recalls. “Total crickets.” So all three founders went on to other jobs. Klomp went to work for Bain & Co. But the website for the startup was still up, and in 2009 they were contacted by a hospital in Spokane, Wash., that was trying to do work in the high-utilizer space and couldn’t find any other solutions. So the three old friends from Boise resurrected the company.
“Smoke in the Kitchen” with Merry Jane. After I was taken down, I got back up. One of our amazing patients is a producer and asked me to come on with Merry Jane. They wanted a food and cannabis experience. Because of my catering experience, and I’m a foodie, they came to my house and shot in my kitchen. They gave me the name Mama Sailene. I’m like your mom, you can come to me. I’m a mother to all. I encapsulate that feeling, you can come to me.
Situations like these make Baumgartner stand out in a state packed with anonymous delivery services. Whatever condition or ailment you suffer from, Carla Baumgartner and her team of doctors and professionals will find a product to give you relief, thus improving the quality of your life. So many dispensaries in California only focus on the percent of THC in their products, rather than the quality and characteristics of the high certain strains and products give. At Ganja Runner, they carry strains developed to help people in need, like 2:1 CBD:THC flower. Recently, Hmbldt metered dose pens have become very popular due to their simplicity. “I love them [Hmbldt pens] because it’s easy to pick the right medicine. If you’re anxious, use the Calm pen… If you’re in pain, use Relief. The simplicity is what Ganja Runner is all about.”
The state evaluated a number of different paths and vendors and ultimately partnered with us. In five months, we connected 100 percent of the state’s acute care hospitals. We brought on all of the managed Medicaid organizations. In the next wave, we’re onboarding skilled nursing facilities and non-Medicare and other ACOs. We’re beginning to bring on ambulatory providers as well.
Each year, to accompany our Healthcare Informatics 100 list of the largest companies in U.S. health information technology, we profile fast-growing companies that could very well make the list in the future. Below, a write-up of the fourth company that made this year’s Up-and-Comers rendition. The remaining two write-ups will be published throughout this week.
Each day, the Medical Cannabis Program receives hundreds of patient applications. The Program has 30 days to approve a completed application from the date we receive it in our office. While it is the patient’s responsibility to submit an application at least 30 days before their card expires, the Program strongly encourages patients submit applications 60 days prior to their card expiring.
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