The findings were then reviewed with the physician IT group, or what Sanders calls the PIT crew, to select what they refer to as the “Goldilocks” cohort. “This is a group of patients that had the combination of low cost, short length of stay, low readmissions and almost zero mortality rate. We then can publish the care path and then monitor adherence to that care path across our physicians,” Sanders says.
Blaze Palm, LLC doing business as OG Cannabis is a fully compliant and State Licensed Medical Cannabis Delivery Dispensary based in San Bernardino County, California. We deliver Medical Marijuana/Weed to San Bernardino, Riverside, Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Our main priority is to serve our patients with top-notch cannabis and non-cannabis related products and to ensure they get their medical needs as quickly as possible. Place an order with us and enhance your weed delivery experience. We strive to deliver the highest quality Customer Service. License Number: M9-18-0000104-TEMP
“We had a guillotine over our head,” says Stephen Anderson, an emergency medicine doctor at MultiCare Auburn Medical Center, which operates eight hospitals in and around Tacoma and Spokane, Washington. Hospitals pleaded for their own solution. “[We said] instead of blocking access, let us coordinate care of high utilizers.” The governor gave them three months.
As each city is in different stages of deciding how they’ll handle commercial marijuana, recreational dispensaries may not yet be either approved or available to consumers. Although adult use is now legal, finding a recreational dispensary will be difficult for Central Valley residents as many cities have moved to ban recreational operations, Fresno, Clovis, and Visalia among them.
Knowing this plant, that’s a female plant from the earth, gives me a way to get back to my center. I’ve also always sought a very active, wondrous, explorative, expansive path to deepening my spiritual growth. I’ve traveled many places solo and I have an incredible, deep meditation practice. I surround myself with a lot of truth, and getting into the flow of the universe.
Meanwhile, with regard to the new form of AI, and the inevitable hype cycle around emerging technologies, Dr. Chang said during his presentation that “When you’re going up the ride, you get excited. But then right at the top, before you are about to go down, you have that moment of clarity—‘What am I getting myself into?’—and that’s where we are now. We are upon that crest of magical hype and we are about to get the trench of disillusionment.” Still, he told his audience, “It is worth the rollercoaster of hype. But I’m here to tell you that it’s going to take longer than you think.”

Still, Marion noted, even the concept of AI, as applied to imaging informatics, remains an area with some areas lacking in clarity. “The reality, he said, “is that I think it means different things to different people. The difference between last year and this year is that some things are coming to fruition; it’s more real. And so some vendors are offering viable solutions. The message I’m hearing from vendors this year is, I have this platform, and if a third party wants to develop an application or I develop an application, or even an academic institution develops a solution, I can run it on my platform. They’re trying to become as vendor-agnostic as possible.”
With the success of the pneumonia care pathway, Flagler Hospital leaders also deployed a new sepsis pathway. The hospital has expanded its plans for using Ayasdi to develop new care pathways, from the original plan of tackling 12 conditions over three years, to now tackling one condition per month. Future plans are to tackle heart failure, total hip replacement, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), hysterectomy and diabetes, among other conditions. Flagler Hospital expects to save at least $20 million from this program in the next three years, according to officials.
The history of Collective Medical Technologies has had several twists and turns, but the Salt Lake City-based company that provides collaborative care management tools has doubled in size in the last six months to over 100 employees. Its platform is used in 15 states, and that number is expected to reach 25 by the end of 2018. The company recently secured $47.5 million in Series A funding to fuel the expansion.
Collective seeks to close provider communication gaps that undermine patient care. It uses data feeds, risk analytics, notifications, and shared care guidelines to reduce emergency department (ED) utilization, inpatient readmissions and downstream care transitions, including to post-acute operators. After collecting data from all EDs visited by a patient, its solution packages that data into actionable insights, and delivers them to clinicians via real-time notifications. Collective is currently partnered with more than a dozen state hospital associations, and recently added the Florida Hospital Association to its network of partners.
So, which artificial intelligence-based solutions will end up going the distance? On a certain level, the answer to that question is simple, said Joe Marion, a principal in the Waukesha, Wis.-based Healthcare Integration Strategies LLC, and one of the imaging informatics industry’s most respected observers. “I think it’s going to be the value of the product,” said Marion, who has participated in 42 RSNA conferences; “and also the extent to which the vendors will make their products flexible in terms of being interfaced with others, so there’s this integration aspect, folding into vendor A, vendor B, vendor C, etc. So for a third party, the more they reach out and create relationships, the more successful they’ll be. A lot of it will come down to clinical value, though. Watson has had problems in that people have said, it’s great, but where’s the clinical value? So the ones that succeed will be the ones that find the most clinical value.”
Each day, the Medical Cannabis Program receives hundreds of patient applications. The Program has 30 days to approve a completed application from the date we receive it in our office. While it is the patient’s responsibility to submit an application at least 30 days before their card expires, the Program strongly encourages patients submit applications 60 days prior to their card expiring.
×