Mitigating the opioid epidemic is a single but timely demonstration of the power of the Collective Medical network. Using the company’s partnership with Washington State as an example, care team collaboration and coordination through Collective Medical has reduced opioid prescriptions coming out of the ED by 24 percent since the program’s inception.
Closest dispensary to my house I'm pretty sure. I think there might be one or two a tiny bit closer, but it's just such a habit for me to go here lol so I just keep coming back. I've never had a bad experience - one time this girl was getting kinda short with me and I felt a teensy bit insulted but in the end she was just trying to get me the best deal on bud as possible :) and she warmed up when I was like ohhhhh ok I get it sorry I'm just so bad at math. She had to write it down lol so embarrassing  so at the end I was genuinely so happy and thankful for her. If you're reading this now thank you so much for helping my stupid ass !! I've had good experiences with every budtender here and even the security guard. 

Collective Medical improves outcomes and lowers costs on an impressive scale. In a Brookings Institution review of Medicaid patients who visited emergency rooms in Washington State, Collective Medical’s network and EDIE application—allowing actionable, real-time coordination across organizations—was one of the core strategies for lowering the number of ED visits by patients with patterns of high ED utilization. By partnering with Collective Medical to focus on these patients, Washington State reported $34 million in savings in emergency costs and a decline of 9.9 percent in emergency department visits in its first year of use in 2013.
Next, Providence drove usage across its five-state system, and Oregon adopted it. “All of a sudden, the world caught up as healthcare started paying for quality instead of just volume,” Klomp says. Growth was slow and methodical as the co-founders sought to understand clinical workflows. “We worked to get real demonstrable outcomes from a clinical and economic perspective,” he adds. “We are pretty conservative. This is a different story than raise a whole bunch of money and try to grow the business fast.”
The AI application uncovered relationships and patterns that physicians either would not have identified or would have taken much longer to identify, Sanders says. For instance, the analysis revealed that for patients with pneumonia and COPD, beginning nebulizer treatments early in their hospital stays improved outcomes tremendously, hospital leaders report.
We realized that while bootstrapping a company gives you tremendous autonomy to do the right thing, it’s a rate limiter to growth. Building a network effects-enabled platform hasn’t been previously done at scale in healthcare. We raised capital to accelerate our growth across the country, to deepen our technical capability with significant R&D dollars, and to gain partners who can help us think through these things since this is our first rodeo.
The state of Virginia had phenomenal leadership and vision. They didn’t just talk about interoperability that could move data from A to B. They’re goal was real coordination. It’s called the EDCC — Emergency Department Care Coordination — initiative because it starts in the emergency department, the front door of the healthcare continuum for so many vulnerable patients. Virginia is seeking to instantiate workflow broadly out into the rest of the community. Not just through interoperability, but by actually prompting coordinated sequences of engagement of various providers across specific patient archetypes to drive resolution.
CEO Jonathan Baran identifies two forces that have jump-started the company. Number one is that all sorts of routine tasks are piling up on physicians and staff, leading to high levels of burnout and negative consequences. “Health systems have really seen this problem and understand there has to be a better way to do this,” he says. Number two is a change in approach by the EHR vendors themselves. “When we started, it was a foreign concept to have an app store for the EHRs. None of them had one yet. But now we have seen widespread adoption of this model across all the major EHRs,” he says. “They now think about themselves as platforms and open marketplaces where people like us can build technology on top of APIs that allow us to integrate our technology into the workflow. That is a big piece. Without those two major forces—market awareness and enabling innovation by building on top of EHRs—this wouldn't be possible.”
The world is focused on these opportunities for good reason, but it’s a necessary but insufficient condition of driving coordination across an otherwise highly fragmented set of providers in a landscape. We have data silos and we need to unify those. We should have a single patient record that isn’t replicated with duplicative tests or because a patient goes from one site of care to another. However, it’s highly unlikely that the entirety of the country is going to be comprised of organizations like Kaiser, Intermountain, and Geisinger. Even those organizations — and I can say this because Kaiser and Intermountain are among the owners of our company — still have affiliated providers that they don’t own and that aren’t on their same record of care. They still require collaboration and coordination across those disparate providers.
Each year, to accompany our Healthcare Informatics 100 list of the largest companies in U.S. health information technology, we profile fast-growing companies that could very well make the list in the future. Below are write-ups of the third and fourth companies that made this year’s Up-and-Comers rendition. The remaining two write-ups will be published later this week.
The history of Collective Medical Technologies has had several twists and turns, but the Salt Lake City-based company that provides collaborative care management tools has doubled in size in the last six months to over 100 employees. Its platform is used in 15 states, and that number is expected to reach 25 by the end of 2018. The company recently secured $47.5 million in Series A funding to fuel the expansion.
Collective seeks to close provider communication gaps that undermine patient care. It uses data feeds, risk analytics, notifications, and shared care guidelines to reduce emergency department (ED) utilization, inpatient readmissions and downstream care transitions, including to post-acute operators. After collecting data from all EDs visited by a patient, its solution packages that data into actionable insights, and delivers them to clinicians via real-time notifications. Collective is currently partnered with more than a dozen state hospital associations, and recently added the Florida Hospital Association to its network of partners.
Utah-based Collective Medical, which has been bootstrapped for eight years, has quietly developed the nation’s largest network for real-time care collaboration. Collective Medical’s technology addresses the full continuum of care in support of many of the country’s most vulnerable individuals—patients with complex needs that are not met at any single point of care. By unifying providers and payers through real-time information alerts, patient context, and collaborative care planning, Collective Medical empowers care teams to identify patients with complex needs and help them get the care they need, when they need it, from those best positioned to deliver it. Collective Medical’s approach has been proven to reduce avoidable emergency department (ED) visits and hospital readmissions, ease transitions of care, and eliminate unnecessary risk and friction from care delivery.

Collective Medical is a Salt Lake City-based developer of collaboration software. I started working on the company with two of my best friends from Boise, Idaho. We grew up together and we all went to Brigham Young University together. Two of us studied computer science and I was the token business guy. I went off to Bain & Company and then Bain Capital for roughly a decade.
My good friend started it 24 years ago and needed help. He asked me to manage the coffee house for six months. I was doing massage therapy and just got back after studying in Thailand. I wanted to give back to the community. I agreed to six months and stayed for four years. I fell in love with an amazing artist community at Abbot’s Habit. A time that is long gone. This is a time before everyone had a personal computer. They came to the shop to grab the newspaper. They were never known for their coffee, they were known for the community. I really got to know this amazing community.

The state of Virginia had phenomenal leadership and vision. They didn’t just talk about interoperability that could move data from A to B. They’re goal was real coordination. It’s called the EDCC — Emergency Department Care Coordination — initiative because it starts in the emergency department, the front door of the healthcare continuum for so many vulnerable patients. Virginia is seeking to instantiate workflow broadly out into the rest of the community. Not just through interoperability, but by actually prompting coordinated sequences of engagement of various providers across specific patient archetypes to drive resolution.
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Besides EDIE, Collective now has other software it licenses to payers and accountable care organizations, but it does not charge post-acute operators, ambulatory providers and others who don't have risk. “Our model is that we license our software to those who could see economic benefit through improving coordination of their members, which makes sense,” he says. “Others may not benefit economically, so we don’t charge them.”

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The New Mexico Department of Health’s Medical Cannabis Program is not affiliated with any third-party businesses that sign patient certifications or complete patient applications. If you have paid a third party to complete your patient application, we advise that you call them first to check when they mailed or delivered your application to the Department of Health.
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