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Original gave them 1 star (I was disappointed hard to reach; and name change; wondering what happened to RAW MMC - and said it was... read more one of the best in the town) - until Kyle step in to talk with me help me to understand everything better; we had good long chats; He explains what was going on with the new California's laws that had changed their business platforms. The 500 pages of CA's laws was not pretty some how. Our talks has only made me felt more stronger want to become activist / advocate for the change for "We The People" to have access to needing medicine; NOT "We For The GOVERNMENT". . . I totally understand clear and appreciates Kyle's time that he invest and chat with me. What a great guy; his original old school is the best.

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“In 2013, President Barack Obama’s attorney general advised prosecutors not to waste money targeting pot growers and sellers that were abiding by state laws but to go after flagrant violations such as trafficking across state lines or selling to minors. Under this policy, several states legalized recreational pot, growers and sellers had begun to drop their guard over fears of a federal crackdown and the business blossomed into a sophisticated, multimillion-dollar industry feeding state government programs with tax dollars.”
After being fed data of past pneumonia treatments, the software automatically created cohorts of patients who had similar outcomes accompanied by the treatments they received at particular times and in what sequence. The program also calculated the direct variable costs, average lengths of stay, readmission and mortality rates for each of those cohorts, along with the statistical significance of its conclusions. Each group had different comorbidities, such as diabetes, COPD and heart failure, which was factored into the application's calculations. At the push of a button, the application created a care path based on the treatment given to the patients in each cohort.
Grab your marijuana and your mat to enjoy the mind-body benefits of weed-enhanced yoga. “I call it contemplative cannabis,” says Stacey Mulvey, owner of Marijuasana, a sort of traveling yoga studio that offers classes in states where the laws allow, including Massachusetts. Practicing yoga under the influence can help advance students’ abilities, Mulvey says. She believes the drug can alter the connection between mind and body just enough to break damaging or limiting patterns of movement.
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Despite the fact that marijuana is illegal under federal law, ten states, as well as the District of Columbia, have legalized its recreational use. And while several other states have passed laws that broadly decriminalize pot, legal marijuana use is still nearly impossible for over one-third of the country. This confusing patchwork of laws helps explain the recent popularity of Cannabidiol (CBD) oil and other related products, which are, for the most part, legal to obtain and use throughout the U.S.
Original gave them 1 star (I was disappointed hard to reach; and name change; wondering what happened to RAW MMC - and said it was... read more one of the best in the town) - until Kyle step in to talk with me help me to understand everything better; we had good long chats; He explains what was going on with the new California's laws that had changed their business platforms. The 500 pages of CA's laws was not pretty some how. Our talks has only made me felt more stronger want to become activist / advocate for the change for "We The People" to have access to needing medicine; NOT "We For The GOVERNMENT". . . I totally understand clear and appreciates Kyle's time that he invest and chat with me. What a great guy; his original old school is the best.
Baran says that although automation of repetitive tasks is the ultimate goal, the first step in automation is delegation. “That means shifting the work from physician to staff and using technology to make that process as easy as possible. For the physicians it looks like automation because you are taking this work off their plates, and we use technology to make the process as easy as possible for the staff.”
“In 2013, President Barack Obama’s attorney general advised prosecutors not to waste money targeting pot growers and sellers that were abiding by state laws but to go after flagrant violations such as trafficking across state lines or selling to minors. Under this policy, several states legalized recreational pot, growers and sellers had begun to drop their guard over fears of a federal crackdown and the business blossomed into a sophisticated, multimillion-dollar industry feeding state government programs with tax dollars.”
As a young adult, I was in a very serious car accident. I broke a lot of bones — my second vertebrae, my neck, ribs, a compound fracture in my leg... It’s a miracle I’m not a quadriplegic. I was on a respirator and couldn’t breathe because there was fluid between my lung and ribcage. I couldn’t move because I had this thing holding up my head. A nurse around every few hours to help me cough so I wouldn’t get pneumonia. Eventually after getting off the respirator, one nurse came around and he mentioned cannabis. He said, “Did you know cannabis does the same type of thing to your lungs? It’s a bronchial dilator. The drug I’m pumping into your lungs is a bronchial dilator.” From that point on I realized I had a choice. I never took another pain pill. I just used cannabis for the next eleven months to recover. I always loved cannabis, but now I had an even more personal connection to the plant.
“Event notification systems and care coordination applications have historically struggled to provide actionable information to providers at the point-of-care,” Noah Knauf, partner at Kleiner Perkins, said in a statement. “Collective Medical is the first technology we’ve seen that allows the providers and payers in a local healthcare system to efficiently collaborate, delivering significantly better outcomes through risk analytics, real-time notifications, and shared care planning tools. Supporting this team is a rare opportunity to be a part of something that is meaningfully changing the way care is delivered in this country.”
In three months, he and his roommate van den Akker, also a computer science student, delivered a web-based application. It included documentation, such as demographics, social determinants, medical history highlights, ER visits and treatment plan. “We tried to minimize the effort hospitals had to expend,” says van den Akker. “If you go after a big data ask, you get pushback.” Still, St. Luke’s didn’t purchase the software. “Hospitals didn’t want to take a bet on two kids in college with no experience in healthcare,” says Green.
“Proposition 64 would allow the state to impose a 15% excise tax on the retail sale of marijuana. Also, the state would be able to levy a cultivation tax on growers of $9.25 per ounce for flowers and $2.75 per ounce for leaves. The ballot measure also would let cities and counties to impose their own taxes to cover costs of services, including enforcement.” (Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times)
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