With the success of the pneumonia care pathway, Flagler Hospital leaders also deployed a new sepsis pathway. The hospital has expanded its plans for using Ayasdi to develop new care pathways, from the original plan of tackling 12 conditions over three years, to now tackling one condition per month. Future plans are to tackle heart failure, total hip replacement, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), hysterectomy and diabetes, among other conditions. Flagler Hospital expects to save at least $20 million from this program in the next three years, according to officials.
Both sides of the argument were present during the discussion as members of the public took to the dais. Law officials rebuked the statement made by pro-cannabis – that by allowing legal marijuana, the black market would disappear – arguing that the imposed taxes would raise costs significantly and drive those who could not afford legal cannabis back to the black market. However, they provided no counters to any claims made by the medical marijuana community which consisted of relief for symptoms of cancer, physical pain, anxiety, and insomnia to name a few. It is perhaps, the driving reason behind the City Council’s move to revisit the total ban.
As of January 1st, medical and recreational (adult use) marijuana became legal in the state of California. Per the Prop 64 measure, adults over the age of 21 can now consume, purchase, possess, and grow cannabis without the fear of prosecution so long as they are within the regulation of the new law… and in accordance with any other policies put in place by the city in which they reside.
Klomp, who helped out with strategy while working in private equity at Bain Capital in Boston, quit in 2014 to join Collective Medical. And last year, Benjamin Zaniello, who was a chief medical information officer at Providence Health & Services in Washington, joined as chief medical officer. Zaniello helped implement Collective Medical at Providence. He was impressed. “They did this alone for many years,” he says. “It wasn’t just a bunch of people with a power point and a dream, or someone from Google with a personal story in healthcare who wants to fix the system.”
My good friend started it 24 years ago and needed help. He asked me to manage the coffee house for six months. I was doing massage therapy and just got back after studying in Thailand. I wanted to give back to the community. I agreed to six months and stayed for four years. I fell in love with an amazing artist community at Abbot’s Habit. A time that is long gone. This is a time before everyone had a personal computer. They came to the shop to grab the newspaper. They were never known for their coffee, they were known for the community. I really got to know this amazing community.
“Certainly, this is another year where machine learning is absolutely dominating the conversation,” said James Whitfill, M.D., CMO at Innovation Care Partners in Scottsdale, Ariz., on Monday. “In radiology, we continue to be aware of how the hype of machine learning is giving way to the reality; that it’s not a wholesale replacement of physicians. There have already been tremendous advances in, for example, interpreting chest x-rays; some of the work that Stanford’s done. They’ve got algorithms that can diagnose 15 different pathological findings. So there is true material advancement taking place.”
Baumgartner’s relationship with cannabis started in her teens, around the same time she was diagnosed with anxiety. Refusing to take pills to deal with her nerves, she took on a move natural approach that included surfing and smoking weed. “My Italian-Catholic mother was horrified,” Baumgartner joked, but clearly her system worked. Now, at age 49, she’s staying ahead of her anxiety in a similar way, with smoking, surfing, meditation and eating right, she’s able to live a successful and productive life.
There continues to be growing interest, and also some hype, around AI tools, but Sanders notes that AI and machine learning are simply another tool. “Historically, what we’ve done is that we had an idea of what we wanted to do, conducted a clinical trial and then proved or disproved the hypothesis, based on the data that we collected. We have a tool with AI which can basically show us relationships that we didn’t know even existed and answer questions that we didn’t know to ask. I think it’s going to open up a tremendous pathway in medicine for us to both reduce cost, improve care and really take better care of our patients,” he says, adding, “When you can say that to physicians, they are on board. They respond to the data.”

Collective Medical will use the funding to expand and advance its network with the goal of empowering care teams across the country to provide patients with the most effective care. As a part of this effort, Collective Medical plans to expand its leadership team and scale its engineering, clinical support, sales and marketing organizations. The company anticipates hiring more than 100 additional team members in the next 12 – 18 months, with the majority based in its Salt Lake City headquarters.

The optimal events, sequence, and timing of care were presented to the physician team using an intuitive interface that allowed them to understand exactly why each step, and the timing of the action, was recommended. Upon approval, the team operationalized the new care path by revising the emergency-department and inpatient order sets in the hospital EHR.
To help fund Collective Medical, Green and van den Akker entered business plan competitions, with the motto “Save lives through better technology in healthcare,” and won a total of $15,000. “We didn’t try to raise money, we were more focused on making sure we can drive value for hospitals,” says van den Akker, who developed the technology using HL7 standards to connect different electronic health records. Green tried to drum up more customers, while holding jobs at National Instruments and later Dell in Austin, Texas.

CHCF is investing in Collective Medical to help providers serving Medicaid patients with complex needs to better share and act on data about those patients in real time. Successfully coordinating a patient’s care, especially if it is complex and involves numerous providers both inside and outside of the health care system, requires effective data sharing. When providers fail to share data, a patient’s care can fall through the cracks or be needlessly duplicated, both of which can result in higher costs and poorer outcomes.


Beyond just offering a good meal, these events create community, says chef and co-owner Joseph Nelson. Diners share a family-style meal at one long table and inevitably find themselves making connections, he says. “It’s a bunch of people who have never met each other before, sitting down for a couple of hours,” Nelson says. “By the end of dinner, you’d think they’d known each other for years.”
The company got its start in 2010. Baran, a Ph.D. student in engineering at the University of Wisconsin at the time, was thinking about how to build apps to make life easier for physicians. He went to a Mayo Clinic Innovation Conference and saw Lyle Berkowitz, M.D., of Northwestern Medicine speaking. “Lyle happened to be speaking there on that very topic, coming at it from the physician perspective,” Baran recalls. “I realized this is exactly the person I need to work with. A few weeks later I drove to Chicago, met with him, and the rest is history. We started this company and have been going ever since.”
Feeling achy? Hit the massage table. At E-motion Sports Massage in Everett, clients can loosen up with a cannabis-infused ointment that many say boosts the impact of the treatment. Massage therapists use a cream infused with cannabinoids, compounds derived from the cannabis plant. They don’t cause a high, but they do have powerful anti-inflammatory and pain-killing effects, says E-motion owner Mercedes Diaz. And because the cream reduces pain, she says, therapists can work muscles more intensively — and effectively. “It is really great for muscle and joint pain, arthritis, sprains, strains,” Diaz says. “With cannabis, we can get in there and do so much more.” The ointment comes in different concentrations, so therapists can choose the right one for each patient’s needs. E-motion offers cannabis cream as a $25 upgrade to any of its regular massage services, which run $100 to $120.
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Google, Facebook and Twitter all have advertising policies that restrict the promotion of the sale of cannabis. Google’s policy prohibits ads that promote “substances that alter mental state for the purpose of recreation.” Facebook restricts any “illegal, prescription, or recreational drugs.” And Twitter bans “illegal drugs” as well as substances that cause “legal highs.” Instagram and Facebook have decided to go a step further by removing pages of cannabis related businesses.
Meanwhile, with regard to the new form of AI, and the inevitable hype cycle around emerging technologies, Dr. Chang said during his presentation that “When you’re going up the ride, you get excited. But then right at the top, before you are about to go down, you have that moment of clarity—‘What am I getting myself into?’—and that’s where we are now. We are upon that crest of magical hype and we are about to get the trench of disillusionment.” Still, he told his audience, “It is worth the rollercoaster of hype. But I’m here to tell you that it’s going to take longer than you think.”
Collective Medical empowers care teams to improve patient outcomes by closing the communication gaps that undermine patient care through seamless collaboration. With a nationwide network engaged with every national health plan in the country, hundreds of hospitals and health systems and tens of thousands of providers—including hospitals, emergency departments, skilled nursing facilities, primary care providers, mental and behavioral health clinics, and others—Collective Medical’s system-agnostic platform is trusted by healthcare organizations and payers to identify at-risk and complex patients and facilitate actionable collaboration to make better care decisions and improve outcomes. Based in Salt Lake City, Collective Medical is proven to streamline transitions of care, improve coordination across diverse care teams, and reduce unnecessary hospital admissions. Learn more at www.collectivemedical.com and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.
Outdoor personal cultivation is prohibited in all zoning districts. Personal indoor cultivation is allowed in compliance with State and City law inclusive of the number of plants allowed and the amount of processed cannabis possessed. Cultivation must take place within the residence, in a locked room or locked out-building. Notarized Property owner permission is required if the property is not owner-occupied. Registration of the address where cultivation will take place is required. The cost of registration is $100 per year. Failure to register can incur penalties and administrative citations. 
As a general rule, the lower the grade of the product the less pain relief you will get. Using medium grade products, it will take 5-6 months for you to see relief. The same is true for the process of rehabilitating cartilage. On the other hand, a high-quality product will usually end your pain in 10-25 days, depending on the extent of your disease. As well, the healing and rehabilitation process begins nearly immediately. When choosing among glucosamine products a pharmaceutical grade liquid formula in liquid form will bring the maximum relief and protection. In addition, a high quality liquid glucosamine formula will do wonders for those recovering from orthopedic surgery.
The world is focused on these opportunities for good reason, but it’s a necessary but insufficient condition of driving coordination across an otherwise highly fragmented set of providers in a landscape. We have data silos and we need to unify those. We should have a single patient record that isn’t replicated with duplicative tests or because a patient goes from one site of care to another. However, it’s highly unlikely that the entirety of the country is going to be comprised of organizations like Kaiser, Intermountain, and Geisinger. Even those organizations — and I can say this because Kaiser and Intermountain are among the owners of our company — still have affiliated providers that they don’t own and that aren’t on their same record of care. They still require collaboration and coordination across those disparate providers.
“But Woodlake – a town of less than 8,000 people about 15 miles northeast of Visalia in Tulare County – has pushed forward at breakneck speed, going from idea to ordinance to the approval of two companies’ dispensary proposals in less than six months. City leaders hope to unlock a treasure trove of tax revenue, which can be used to beef up a thinning public service budget and attract customers to a blip on the map found well off the beaten path.” (Rory Appleton, The Fresno Bee)
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