Mitigating the opioid epidemic is a single but timely demonstration of the power of the Collective Medical network. Using the company’s partnership with Washington State as an example, care team collaboration and coordination through Collective Medical has reduced opioid prescriptions coming out of the ED by 24 percent since the program’s inception.
Scanning the exhibit floor on Monday, Glenn Galloway, CIO of the Center for Diagnostic Imaging, an ambulatory imaging center in the Minneapolis suburb of St. Louis Park, Minn., noted that “There’s a lot of focus on AI this year. We’re still trying to figure out exactly what it is; I think a lot of people are doing the same, with AI.” In terms of whether what’s being pitched is authentic solutions, vaporware, or something in between, Galloway said, “I think it’s all that. I think there will be some solutions that live and survive. There are some interesting concepts of how to deliver it. We’ve been talking to a few folks. But the successful solutions are going to be very focused; not just AI for a lung, but for a lung and some very specific diagnoses, for example.” And what will be most useful? According to Galloway, “Two things: AI for the workflow and the quality. And there’ll be some interesting things for what it will do for the quality and the workflow.”
Unfortunately, that's not the only message this raid sent. Thanks to decades of demonization, much of it fueled by alcohol and tobacco interests, marijuana still carries a stigma. Police actions like this only reinforce that stigma. That people who get their medicine from dispensaries instead of pharmacists are druggies, and the employees of such establishments can still get their mugs displayed like drug dealers.
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